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The Purple Tide

The student news site of Chantilly High School (Chantilly, VA)

The Purple Tide

The student news site of Chantilly High School (Chantilly, VA)

The Purple Tide

Students and parents bond from classroom to family room

Assistant+principal+Jihoon+Shin+and+his+three+children%2C+freshman+Tyler++Shin%2C+sophomore+Carter+Shin+and+sophomore+Reagan+Shin+participate+in+the+homecoming+activities+on+Oct.+6.%0A%0A
Used with permission of Jihoon Shin
Assistant principal Jihoon Shin and his three children, freshman Tyler Shin, sophomore Carter Shin and sophomore Reagan Shin participate in the homecoming activities on Oct. 6.

Within the walls of a school campus lies a group of teachers who not only guide their students to success, but also walk the path of education hand-in-hand with their own children. While this unique circumstance creates a bridge between school and homes, it also creates a connection between the teacher and their child.  This bond is notably evident at CHS, where 30 individuals share this dual role of an educator and parent.

“The greatest benefit is having the opportunity to experience high school together with them. It’s like living your lives side by side,” assistant principal Jihoon Shin said. “I like being a part of the events together with them.”

Research from Marlene Moretti and Maya Peled published in 2004 says that many parents feel they have little or no influence in their children’s life and they complain about the fact that their child’s fate rests outside their hands; however, in the situation where the parent works at the same school as the child, the parent and child relationship is interconnected through school which allows them to feel more attached to each other.  

“It’s pretty nice,” sophomore Carter Shin said.“There’s a lot of interaction throughout the day and it’s a good way to just talk about things in school.

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Math teacher Annie Chong tries to avoid talking about math with her daughter, sophomore Liz Chong, unless she requests it in order to remain a professional boundary. Annie worked at the school before Liz came to high school which was an adjustment for both the parent and child after she came.

Math teacher Annie Chong and sophomore Liz Chong share a laugh while Annie teaches Liz how to do a math problem on Oct. 26. Picture by Athula Cheboli

 “I used to bring all my children on all the teacher work days, so they’re familiar with the building and things in my room,” Annie said. “Now she’s finally here.”

Liz does not have a bus available to her because she lives out of the school boundaries so she finds it difficult to stay extra time after school while waiting for her mom, but also enjoys getting extra help on her subjects.

 

“It’s kind of hard because I actually stay after school a lot and I can’t go early on early release days and it is annoying.” Liz said. “But it’s also kind of nice because I’m able to get help and it is easy because she teaches the curriculum and can give me specific help.”

In a student’s high school career, teachers and their children come to school together, but as time goes on, students get their driver’s license and can come to school on their own. This limits the interactions between the teacher and their children. Another way the pair sees each other throughout school is a sport.  

Physical education teacher Melissa Bibbe and senior Peyton Bibbee attend the Homecoming parade on Oct. 6.
Used with permission of Peyton Bibbee

“As a coach, it’s difficult because I would definitely say that I’m harder on her than any of my other athletes because if I’m not, then I can’t be hard on my other athletes,” physical education teacher and varsity soccer coach Melissa Bibbee said. 

According to research from Ausra Lisinskiene and Marc Lochbaum published in 2022, young sports are surrounded and interrelated with many social interactions such as parents and coaches. Senior Peyton Bibbee’s soccer coach is also her mom which impacts her season.

“If I get anything, sometimes people just think it’s because of her but overall it is a really fun season with my friends and my mom,” Peyton said.

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Athula Cheboli
Athula Cheboli, Staff Writer
Athula Cheboli is a freshman in her first year with The Purple Tide. Outside of school she does dance and enjoys reading. In her free time, she hangs out with her friends and watches Dance Moms.
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