A new beginning introduced for the year’s end

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Shreeja Tangutur, Academics Editor

The minutes between Dec. 31 and Jan. 1 are filled with anticipation for the year ahead. As a day of reflection and hope for the future, New Year’s Eve is marked by a variety of traditions and celebrations, such as meeting with friends and family.  

“On New Year’s Eve, I go to my uncle’s house or [my uncle’s family] come over to my house,” junior Afreen Refai said. “Before the new year officially begins, we eat a bunch of food, joke around with each other and talk together as a whole family.”

Many celebrate the New Year by going to parties or concerts. However, due to social distance guidelines, several students are changing their plans. 

“On New Year’s Eve, I usually go to a party and participate in the countdown,” sophomore Bala Mazimdar said. “While I can’t go to a party this year, I will bake red velvet cakes on New Year’s and watch a couple of movies or so.”

The Times Square ball drop, an event that over 1 million people typically attend, will be broadcasted virtually around the country this year to prevent people from contracting the virus.

 “I [think] most people will tune into the ball drop this year despite it being a virtual event,” Mazimdar said. “There may be even more [of a] virtual presence than ever because it will most likely be widely broadcasted, more so than other years.”

One reason that the ball drop is well-known due to the various performances featuring popular singers and bands. For the virtual ball drop, many artists will still be performing at Times Square, with their songs broadcasted across the country. According to SILive, this year the ball drop will celebrate essential workers, first responders, doctors and scientists.

“It’s important that doctors and scientists are honored at the ball drop because these people are risking their lives to keep up safe, healthy [and even] alive in some cases,” Refai said. 

According to FilmDaily, there will be a relatively small gathering at the ball drop; these people will assist with the countrywide broadcast. There will be socially distanced activities to accommodate for public safety. 

“I hope people will be smart and celebrate at home with their families because more and more people are [getting sick] each day,” Refai said. “We can start new traditions this year and save partying for when it is safe to go.”

I hope people will be smart and celebrate at home with their families because more and more people are [getting sick] each day,” Refai said. “We can start new traditions this year and save partying for when it is safe to go.”

— Afreen Refai