Staff Editorial: All college decisions should be celebrated

Costs+vary+greatly+between+community+colleges+and+four-year+colleges+and+universities.+Sources%3A+USAA%2C+WSCC%2C+and+Shostal+Associates

Sanyu Srikanth

Costs vary greatly between community colleges and four-year colleges and universities. Sources: USAA, WSCC, and Shostal Associates

Sanyu Srikanth, Staff Writer

After having adjusted to SAT cancellations, changes in the college admissions process, deadline extensions and alterations in sports recruiting, seniors eagerly await the results that will guide their futures. However, as students receive acceptances and rejections, people often judge others based on their preferences for where to attend. 

There is no one “best” college for everyone since there are several aspects that need to be taken into consideration: finance, scholarships, courses, location and facilities.

According to Education Corner, family income and tuition costs are two of the major factors in choosing between community college and a university. While one year of university costs about $30,000 on average, four years of community college can cost about $50,000. 

Community college is often the most feasible decision for people with financial challenges so they can attend college with less debt and transfer to any university after two years. For example, according to U.S. News, for William & Mary, one year of tuition costs $23,362, while for Northern Virginia Community College, it averages up to $5,610.

Often student preferences are based on certain traditional college experiences as well. According to Money Crashers, preferences on flexibility of class times, work and internship opportunities, and more resources for students looking forward to English language learning are all beneficial factors that community colleges serve. Therefore, it’s necessary to remember that college decisions are based on where a certain student can succeed best at.

It’s unfair to make assumptions about a student based on where they choose to go as a college is more than its name or national ranking. We should all stop perceiving those who go to a lesser known college as inferior or less valuable. Going to a highly competitive university is simply not the path for everyone, and we, as a community, should stop judging others for choosing to pick a state university or community college instead. 

Every student’s path should be celebrated due to their desire to pursue additional education that will lead them to reach their dreams.